LinkedIn’s new feature tackles salary transparency

Image: LinkedIn

For all of LinkedIn’s career-building tools, one area where the professional network has fallen short is in helping shed light on the black box that is salary information. That is now changing.

The company introduced a new tool called LinkedIn Salary that aims to help users learn more about the salaries in their industry and how making changes to their current career impacts how much they make.

Enter a job title and a city and the tool turns up results showing the median earnings for individuals with that job title in the city you selected. Besides base salary, it also takes into account other forms of compensation, like bonuses and stock options.

LinkedIn, which is increasingly focusing on a data-driven approach to its services, will also let you dig into the salary data so you can get a better idea of how different factors impact salaries in a given field. For example, it will show how salaries for a given role vary by company, as well as how company size and education level impact earnings.

Image: LinkedIn

LinkedIn is not the first company to try to bring more transparency to salary information Glassdor has a similar product for helping people determine whether they are being paid fairly but the company says it is more focused on helping its users maximize their potential rather than assessing fairness or whether a particular salary is competitive.

Instead, the goal of all of this, LinkedIn says, is to “help professionals around the world make better career decisions and optimize their earning potential now.” And the company says we can expect to see it integrate salary information into more parts of its network in the future (LinkedIn Premium users will also see salary details in the site’s job search results.)

LinkedIn Salary is available to all the site’s users, though those who don’t subscribe to a paid tier will need to first enter their own salary before they can access all of the information (premium users can see everything without first handing over their own details.)

Read more: http://mashable.com/2016/11/02/linkedin-salary/

How Much Fashion Bloggers Earned on Instagram Post

Street style, blogger Chiara Ferragni — The Blonde Salad — arriving at Balmain Spring Summer 2017 show held at Hotel Potocki, in Paris, France, on 29 September 2016.

Image: Sipa USA via AP

LONDON Instagram’s fashion stars can be a source of style inspo, ideas and useful tips.

While fashion bloggers’ feeds are replete with effortless-yet-flawless photography, reality couldn’t be further from the glamorous lives portrayed via social media.

Whether bloggers are publishing posts sponsored by brands, or parading outfits paid for by brands during fashion week, shrewd bloggers and brands have turned social media into a big-buck business.

This monetisation of fashion blogging a.k.a. “influencer marketing” has caused something of a rift in the fashion industry, with Vogue‘s creative digital director lashing out at fashion bloggers who are killing the fashion industry.

“Note to bloggers who change head-to-toe, paid-to-wear outfits every hour: Please stop. Find another business.”

“Note to bloggers who change head-to-toe, paid-to-wear outfits every hour: Please stop. Find another business. You are heralding the death of style,” Sally Singer Vogue‘s creative digital director wrote in an editors’ piece about Milan Fashion Week.

In an even more scathing rebuke, Alessandra Codinha Vogue.com fashion news editor hailed fashion bloggers’ behaviour during fashion week “embarrassing” and “funny.”

“Rather than a celebration of any actual style, it seems to be all about turning up, looking ridiculous, posing, twitching in your seat as you check your social media feeds, fleeing, changing, repeating,” wrote Codinha.

But this incessant checking of social media has nothing to do with vanity it’s pure business.

Mashable talked to a spokesperson for Influencer Marketing Agency an agency that matches brands with bloggers, vloggers and influencers to find out just how much money is behind the posts filling our Insta feeds.

According to a spokesperson for the agency, the fee per post is “highly dependent” on the audience the brand wishes to reach and the platform on which the influencer is publishing.

“This of course includes reach, strength of relationship with their followers and credibility,” the spokesperson told Mashable.

“Influencers can earn anywhere from below 100 ($110) to 100 times this amount (10,000, $11,006) for content they create in collaboration with a brand,” the spokesperson confirmed.

Jenny Woods, founder of the social media startup for marketing teams Zaapt, told Mashable that a fashion and lifestyle Instagram star with 1.3m followers was recently paid 5,000 ($6,104) for an Instagram post.

“Another brand paid 17,000 ($20,749) for a reality TV star to tweet and Instagram about their brand in a series of posts. The influencer has 1.2m followers on Instagram,” Woods continued.

Woods says that an influencer with more than 1 million followers can expect to earn between 5,000 ($6,104) and 20,000 (24,406) per post.

When it comes to adding a price tag to an Instagram post, the more followers the better. And, the massive reach commanded by social media savvy celebrities like Kim Kardashian West can carry a six-figure sum.

Chris Kyriacou founder of iSocial social media agency told Mashable that the fee depends entirely on how engaged the influencer’s audience is, and on the “value” of certain influencers.

Earlier this year, a marketing expert told Page Six that the Kardashians earn hundreds of thousands of dollars per Instagram post.

“Now, for $400,000, you get the Kardashians to post on Instagram,” the source told Page Six, referencing makeup, clothing and music as items she frequently posts about.

Time to start building your social media following, perhaps.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2016/10/12/fashion-bloggers-paid/